Tag Archives: bombing

Truth & Reconciliation, Part III, by Ross Caputi

      There was no casus belli (just cause) for the 2003 invasion of Iraq. The leaders of the coalition forces treated the lives of Iraqi civilians with reckless disregard as they bombed and invaded Iraq, citing intelligence they … Continue reading

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Imagine an occupation of the U.S.

Imagine that on September 11, 2001, instead of four airplanes (allegedly) used as missiles, massive air strikes had targeted numerous strategic sites in the U.S.

Over 50 aerial bomb drops
Stenciling boasting over 50 aerial bomb drops. Image in public domain.

Instead of attacks over a few hours on one morning, consider the bombardment’s continuing unabated for three-and-a-half weeks, for the purpose of “shocking and aweing” … Continue reading

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Street sewage in new “democratic” Iraq (Liberate THIS, Part 9)

In February and March 2004, I made a 19-day journey to Iraq. The first memories of my life were from those early years in Iraq. My life would start over again there, too.

With Baghdad International Airport controlled by American occupation forces (as it still is today), I flew to Jordan and made the 10-hour car ride to Baghdad.

In Iraq’s capital, a year after the invasion, damage from bombing raids was omnipresent. Iraq had been liberated, alright—from sovereignty, security, electricity, and potable water. The new “democratic” Iraq modeled sewage in the streets, rolling … Continue reading

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“They started bombing” (Liberate THIS, Part 1)

“Dahlia, come here,” my father called.

The resignation in his voice told me that something was wrong.

On the east coast of the United States, it was 7 p.m., January 16, 1991. In Iraq—my father’s birthplace—it was 3 a.m. the following day. I was upstairs … Continue reading

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